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Smartphones

Three days with a Droid. The Result is it’s Fantastic

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Nov 09 2009 01:09 am

droid_with_nav_from_BGR

After three days with a Droid (actually two of them), I’m glad to say my expectations have been reached. The Droid is the best gadget/phone I have ever owned by far. I should note that I’m coming from a Window’s 6.0 Mobile phone which now feels light-years behind Android.

This is my first Android phone so it did take me about an hour to get comfortable with how everything works. For the most part, everything is user intuitive, especially the stuff you would use daily such as calling someone, SMS, or browsing the web. It could be difficult finding a particular setting to change, but I was able to find them all eventually. Droid is the first phone with Android 2.0 and I particularly like how it handles notifications, widgets, apps, and multitasking.

All notifications including SMS messages, new e-mails, app updates, missed phone calls, and anything else requiring your non-immediate attention are grouped together in a status bar at the top of the screen. The status bar can be pulled down at anytime listing all the notifications. The pull-down notifications is really convient as I wasn’t bombarded by messages constantly when I was browsing the web or using another app.

Widgets are also really useful as now I can get quick updates just by looking at my home screen. Facebook status is now right on my home screen along with calendar appointments. Speaking of Facebook, the integration with my contacts was a neat feature I wasn’t expecting. The pictures next to the contacts are now updated with the latest Facebook picture, and that picture shows up when he/she calls.

The screen of the Droid is gorgeous. It’s listed as 3.7″ at 854 x 480 pixels. My eyes used to hurt if I stared at my old Samsung i760 screen long enough, but not with the Droid. The network is also great as I’m averaging around 1.3 Mbps when I do a speed test. Battery life is good and should last a full day with more than average usage. The slide-out keyboard is Ok. I found myself using the touch screen keyboard in landscape mode more than the slide-out version. Apparently multitasking is a big deal since the iPhone can’t do it, but I can’t imaging not being able to listen to music and type an email at the same time.

The killer app on the Droid is Goggle Nav. There is a reason why Garmin and TomTom’s stock dropped 20% the day Google Nav was announced. I’ve used it over the past couple days and it has huge potential, but there is a reason it’s still in beta. The 3-D street view used as directions is hard to beat, but I found it wasn’t accurate enough to trust. The most useful part was the real-time traffic data.

The biggest problem I had with the Droid was that the first one I received was defective. The phone crashed liked crazy with reboots around 20 to 30 times a day. After coming from Window’s Mobile, I didn’t think it could get any worse, but it did. I thought it was an incompatible app for a awhile, but found out through the Motorola support forums that it was something internal to the phone. Verizon replaced it without a hassle and said I was the only one to come back with any problems. The store I was at sold over 150 Droid phones so that strangely made me feel more comfortable as it looks like the phone has some good quality control.

After three days with the Droid, I can’t really think of any major negatives… and that was with a broken phone for a day and a half. I wouldn’t mind more apps, but I think that’s coming now with the Avalanche of new Android phones. The camera and slide out keyboard could be better, but they are manageable. If your thinking about getting a Droid …than go get one. I highly recommend it and I would even recommend it to non-techie types.

My New i760 PDA Phone vs My Old xv6700 Phone

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
May 19 2008 10:39 pm

xv6700 vs i760

A couple of months ago, my xv6700 PDA phone crashed for the final time. Not that I’m complaining because it gave me a great excuse to buy a new phone. I went with Samsung’s i760, and it’s been a significant improvement. The simple feature of having number buttons on the front of the phone is a something I’ve missed since I bought the xv6700 more than 2 years ago. To dial a phone number on the xv6700, I would have to use the touch screen which my fingers were too big for, or use the slideout QWERTY keyboard which was a pain. As the picture shows below, the i760 has number buttons on the front of the phone so now entering phone numbers is as easy as entering numbers on a regular phone.

The xv6700 was one of the first PDA phones Verizon offered with Wi-Fi capabilities. I refused to pay the $50/month for a data package so Wi-Fi was important. The xv6700 wasn’t too bad of a phone as it was able to do all the PDA phone functions I could ask for. Where the i760 excels is in reliability. I had the i760 for 2 months now and it has crashed on me once. The xv6700 with Windows Mobile 5 would crash weekly. Windows Mobile 6 on the i760 seems to be more stable, at least so far.

The i760 seems to be faster and more responsive than the xv6700. The i760 also has a significantly louder speaker, is thinner, and has built-in Microsoft Voice command features. It’s pretty cool speaking out “What are my appointments” and hearing a response. I didn’t have to teach the phone my voice which is a big time saver.

In the end, the i760 may delay my future Android phone purchase. Arguably, the i760 is one of the best phones out there today.

PS3 vs. iPhone, since they are both $600

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 21 2007 10:54 pm



The $600 price tag for the PS3 caused plenty of backlash towards Sony with critics saying Sony priced out many of its customers. Yet, Apple’s $600 price tag for its iPhone has not caused the same negative reaction. The focus has been on iPhone’s unique user interface and advanced technology. Does the PS3’s dual HDMI v1.3 ports and built-in Blu-ray drive not equal iPhone’s advanced touchscreen and user interface? Below is a hardware and feature comparison between the PS3 and iPhone.

 

iPhone

iPhone

PS3

PS3

Advanced Features iPod and a phone
Multi-touch screen
Automatic screen rotation
User interface
Blu-ray Drive
Dual HDMI v1.3 ports
Cell processor with 8 cores
DVD upscaling
Max Resolution 320 x 480 pixels 1920 x 1080 pixels
User Interface Multi-touch screen PS3 controller with Bluetooth and motion sensors
Networking EDGE wireless data network
Quad-band GSM phone network
Bluetooth 2.0
Wi-Fi (802.11b/g)
Gigabit Ethernet (x3)
Wi-Fi (802.11b/g)
Bluetooth
Storage 4GB or 8GB 20GB or 60GB or 80GB (Korean version)
Processor Unknown – rumored to be ARM based Cell – Core @ 3.2GHz with 8 cores @ 3.2GHz
RAM Unknown 256 MB
Plays Music Yes Yes
Plays Videos Yes Yes
Connect to Internet Yes Yes
Mobile Yes No
Connects to TV No Yes
Talk on phone Yes Yes (through VOIP software)
Price $599 for 8 GB version
$499 for 4 GB version
$599 for 60 GB version
$499 for 20 GB version

The chart reveals that you get more bang for the buck out of a PS3. The chart also shows how bad Sony’s marketing is. Almost every article written during the PS3 launch mentioned the $600 price tag, and its high price tag caused a huge negative vibe with the internet community. Yet, Apple’s $600 price tag for a phone has not created that same negative vibe. No wonder why Apple wins marketing awards year after year.

OK, so comparing the PS3 to the iPhone is like comparing apples and oranges (no pun attended). One is a mobile device and one is a family room device. However, they are both $600, and they are both advanced for their respective category. The question is would you spend your hard earned $600 on an iPhone or a PS3?

More Information:

PDA Phone Example 15 – Games

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 20 2007 10:01 pm

My xv6700 PDA phone has a 416 MHz processor and 64 MB RAM. In comparison, a PS2 has a 295 MHz processor with 32 MB RAM. It’s easy to see that the PDA phone has the capabilities for gaming. Games such as Call of Duty 2, Myst, Madden NFL, and Age of Empires are already available for Window’s Mobile 5 phones. 

My experiences with gaming on a xv6700 PDA phone has been mixed. I found games using the stylus and touchscreen work better than games using the xv6700’s mini joystick. Myst and Riven are perfect examples of games that work well with the xv6700’s touchscreen. Old fashioned arcade games like Frogger also work well.

PDA Phone Example 14 – Laptop Internet Connectivity

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 20 2007 09:56 pm

Getting a laptop internet connection can be difficult when traveling. Options include searching for a Wi-Fi hotspot or getting a data card from a wireless carrier. Another option is to use your PDA phone’s data plan to wirelessly tether data to your laptop. The PDA phone has the ability to act like a modem and provide an internet connection to the laptop via Bluetooth.

The speed of the internet connection will be limited by Bluetooth or by the cell phone carrier’s data service. If your PDA phone and your laptop both have Bluetooth 2.0, then your limited by 3 Mb/s. Otherwise, Bluetooth 1.2 will limit you to 1 Mb/s. Your cell phone’s data plan is limited by whether it uses EDGE (236 kb/s), EV-DO Rev. 0 (2.4 Mb/s), EV-DO Rev. A (3.1 Mb/s) or HSDPA (3.6 Mb/s) technology. Make sure your PDA phone is compatible with one of the high speed data technologies mentioned above.

A great Bluetooth tethering how-to can be found at Engadget’s website. They have a story titled How-To: Use your EV-DO Pocket PC phone for internet access on how to wirelessly tether a laptop to a xv6700 PDA phone.

PDA Phone Example 13 – VOIP phone

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 20 2007 09:51 pm

Skype has a version of their VOIP software available for PDA phones. You might be asking why anybody would want to use VOIP on a cell phone. There are a few good reasons, and there were a few times I found Skype on my PDA phone useful. The first example I can think of is the time I ran out of minutes. Instead of paying the ridiculous 40 cents per minute Verizon charges, I used my Wi-Fi network and talked to my friends through Skype’s mobile software.

The second time I found Skype on my PDA phone useful is when I traveled overseas and couldn’t use Verizon’s cellular service. Verizon uses CDMA technology while the rest of the world uses the incompatible GSM technology. The only way I could use my Verizon PDA phone was to find a Wi-Fi hot spot and use Skype Mobile. Of course, this example works anytime you don’t have cellular service, but have Wi-Fi access.

The quality of Skype’s service has improved over Skype’s initial software release. I kept on getting connection and latency issues with the first version. The current version is more stable, but still has its hiccups. I wouldn’t recommend using Skype as a replacement for regular cell phone use. It’s more of a good backup for now.

More information:

PDA Phone Example 12 – Control Your Home Theater Network

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 20 2007 09:45 pm

It seems that almost every new home theater network device out there is including an Ethernet port. New HDTVs, receivers, home automation devices, DVRs, HD DVD/Blu-ray players, HTPC, game consoles and even appliances all can communicate with the internet and within your home theater network. The PDA phone is the perfect device to control all these devices since it’s always in your pocket, and has the ability to always be connected to the internet whether at home, work, or outside.

What if you are sitting at your porch and you wanted to turn the speakers on and listen to some MP3’s on your HTPC. Without getting up, you could use your PDA phone to tell your receiver to output audio to the porch’s speakers, and to switch its audio input to the HTPC. You could then remote admin into your HTPC and pick which songs you want to play, which will now be playing on your porch’s speakers; all without getting up. Another example I could think of is home automation. You could use the web browser in your PDA phone to turn on/off lights, lower the AC temperature, or view security cameras.

I realize this is more of a future-type example. HDTVs and receivers only recently started to have internet connections, and most people don’t have PDA phones, HTPCs or home automation devices right now. However, the potential is there for the PDA phone to become a remote control for your whole home theater network.

More Information:

PDA Phone Example 11 – Streaming Video Player

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 20 2007 09:30 pm

The cell phone companies want to nickel and dime us for everything, and now they are hoping we’ll pay an extra $20/month for streaming TV video. Another choice would be to put the $20/month into a data plan, and purchase a slingbox. For those who don’t know, a slingbox lets a user stream video over the internet from a cable box, DVR, or any video source. Slingboxe’s Mobile software can be installed on a PDA phone, where the user can change channels and watch live TV.

Slingbox PDA Phone Media Player Slingbox PDA Phone Media Player Slingbox PDA Phone Media Player Slingbox PDA Phone Media Player

There are other ways to watch streaming video on your PDA phone. One way is through youtube, which has launched a mobile version of there website at m.youtube.com. Another way is through a free program called ORB, that lets users stream audio, video, or data files over the internet to any computer or PDA phone.

More information:

Apple’s iPhone

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 19 2007 09:48 pm
Apple's iPhone
Price Comparison
PDA Accessories
PDA Phone Games
Wireless Plans
  • 3.5 inch diagonal screen
  • 320 x 480 pixel resolution screen at 160 ppi
  • Automatically rotates screen orientation
  • OS X operating system
  • Multi-touch screen
  • 2 MP camera
  • Wi-Fi (802.11b/g)
  • EDGE internet service (384 kbit/s max)
  • Bluetooth 2.0
  • Storage – 4GB or 8GB
  • Speakerphone
  • Talk time of up to 8 hours
  • USB 2.0
  • Safari web browser

AT&T 8525 PDA Phone

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 19 2007 09:46 pm
AT&T 8525 PDA Phone

Price Comparison
Sprint version (Mogul)
T-Mobile version (Wing)
HTC TyTn

  • 2.8 inch diagonal screen
  • 240 x 320 pixel resolution screen with 64,000 colors
  • Windows Mobile 5 (free upgrade to Mobile 6 in the fall
  • Slide-out QWERTY keyboard
  • 2 MP camera with video capabilities
  • Wi-Fi (802.11b/g)
  • UMTS/HSDPA enabled, and EDGE high speed internet service
  • Bluetooth 2.0
  • 400MHz Samsung stacked CPU
  • 64 MB RAM
  • 128 MB ROM
  • Micro SD card slot
  • Speakerphone
  • Direct Push Technology capable
  • Turn-by-turn GPS navigation with AT&T TeleNav
  • Talk time of up to 4 hours
  • Mini-USB port

PDA Phone Example 10 – GPS Navigation

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 17 2007 11:13 pm

The same mapping software that is sold with GPS devices such as TomTom or Garmin is available for PDA phones. The mapping software uses the PDA phones built-in GPS unit, or a portable Bluetooth GPS unit. My xv6700 internal GPS is not assessable so I had to buy a small portable GPS receiver to communicate with the iGuidance GPS navigation software I also purchased. The software is as good, and if not better, than the TomTom unit my friend bought. The iGuidance software includes 3-D mapping, turn-by-turn directions with voice prompts, route calculations, trip stats, automatic re-routing on wrong turns, and a lot more. 

The screen size of the xv6700 is 2.8 inches and is just large enough to read the maps. One issue I have with the screen is the glare makes it unreadable when the sun is directly pointing at it. I’m hoping to fix this problem by buying an anti-glare screen guard, but I haven’t found one yet. 

Google also offers mapping software (found at this link) that you can download to your PDA phone. The mapping data is always sent through the internet so you will need either a data plan or Wi-Fi access. If you have internet access, then google maps on a PDA phone is almost exactly the same as Google maps on a PC including satellite pics, directions, and real-time traffic info. If you don’t have internet access or you would like more features, then take a look at TomTom or iGudance navigation software.

PDA Phone Example 9 – Satellite Radio Player

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 17 2007 10:50 pm

Sirius and XM both offer online streaming. With a data plan or Wi-Fi access, a PDA phone can turn into a portable satellite radio. Both Sirius and XM offer cheaper internet only subscriptions, which means you won’t even have to buy a satellite radio. Users in a big city might even find that their data plan signal is stronger than a satellite radio signal. 

For some reason, mobile users can’t just go to Sirius.com or xmradio.com and click on the streaming links like regular PC users do. Sirius and XM should really find a way to fix this, but for now there are other programs available to stream satellite radio. I’ve been using Sirius WM5, and have no problems. Another program that works for Sirius subscribers is SiriuCE 2.

PDA Phone Example 8 – Internet Radio Player

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 17 2007 10:47 pm

If you don’t subscribe to Sirius or XM satellite radio, then you still have the option of listening to the thousands of internet radio stations online. The streaming radio sites include all the radio stations that simulcast their broadcast online, and all the internet specific streaming sites including live365.com, SHOUTcast.com, and ICEcast.com

A great website that lists American and Canadian radio stations streaming online is thestreamcenter.com.

PDA Phone Example 7 – MP3 Music Player

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 17 2007 10:42 pm

My xv6700 may not be at the same quality level as an iPod, but it’s close enough. Storage size is limited to the space available on the mini SD card, which currently maxes out at 4 GB. Over 1000 songs can be stored on 4 GB so I have no problems there. The user interface is where I miss the iPod. It’s harder to find songs with Window’s Pocket Media Player, and I’m yet to find any free software that works better. Button wise, the xv6700 works great with the mini joystick controlling the volume (up/down), the songs (left/right), and pause/play ability. 

I use the PC version of Window’s Media Player to sync all my songs with the xv6700, and I use Doppler to get all my podcast feeds. There’s a great tutorial on how to get your podcast subscriptions synced with Doppler and Windows Media Player here

In the end, not having to carry around two gadgets in my pocket, and not having to sync two devices is what keeps the iPod in the desk drawer.

PDA Phone Example 6 – Video Camera

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 17 2007 10:35 pm

My xv6700 doesn’t have video camera abilities, but some of the newer PDA phones are starting to carry this feature. The same low lightning and no optics problems that impairs camera phones will also impair PDA phones with built-in video cameras. However, the convenience factor is high as all the “I wish I had a vide camera” moments will disappear.

The things to look for in a PDA phone with a built in video camera is the maximum resolution and frame rate it can record. For a comparison, standard video cameras record at 640×480 pixels at 30 frames per second. Another aspect to look for is where all the video will be stored. Most PDA phones have slots for micro or mini SD flash cards, which can store a few GB of video.

T-Mobile Wing

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 17 2007 10:33 pm
T-Mobile Wing

Price Comparison
PDA Accessories
PDA Phone Games
Wireless Plans

  • 2.8 inch diagonal screen
  • 240 x 320 pixel resolution screen with 65,000 colors
  • Windows Mobile 6.0
  • Slide-out QWERTY keyboard
  • 2 MP camera
  • Wi-Fi (802.11b/g)
  • EDGE internet service (384 kbit/s max)
  • Bluetooth 2.0
  • 201Mhz TI OMAP 850 processor
  • 64 MB RAM
  • 128 MB ROM
  • Micro SD card slot
  • Speakerphone
  • Talk time of up to 4 hours
  • Mini-USB port

Palm Treo 755p

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 17 2007 10:31 pm
Palm 755p

Price Comparison
PDA Accessories
PDA Phone Games
Wireless Plans

  • 2.5 inch diagonal screen
  • 320 x 320 pixel resolution screen with 65,000 colors
  • Palm OS 5.4.9
  • 1.3 MP camera with automatic light balance
  • Video capture with 352×288 resolution
  • Dual-band CDMA2000 EvDO high speed internet service (2.4 Mb/s max)
  • Bluetooth 1.2
  • Intel XScale 312MHz processor
  • 128MB / 60MB persistent user storage, non-volatile flash
  • miniSD card slot
  • QWERTY keyboard
  • Speakerphone
  • Talk time of up to 4.2 hours

Palm Treo 750

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 17 2007 10:27 pm
Palm 750

Price Comparison
PDA Accessories
PDA Phone Games
Wireless Plans

  • 2.5 inch diagonal screen
  • 240 x 240 pixel resolution screen with 65,000 colors
  • Windows Mobile 5.0
  • 1.3 MP camera with video support
  • EDGE internet service (384 kbit/s max)
  • Bluetooth 1.2
  • 300MHz Samsung processor
  • 128MB / 60MB persistent user storage, non-volatile flash
  • miniSD card slot
  • QWERTY keyboard
  • Speakerphone
  • Direct Push technology for e-mail
  • Talk time of up to 4 hours

PDA Phone Example 5 – Digital Camera

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 14 2007 09:35 pm

It’s hard to get a phone without a camera these days. Having a digital camera built into my phone has come in handy and has stopped all those “I wish I had a camera” moments. It’s also nice seeing the camera quality improving with most new camera phones featuring 2 megapixel sensors.

Camera phones are best at close up pictures. Make sure you have adequate lighting since most camera phones don’t have a flash. Camera phones also don’t have optics, which means you won’t be able to zoom in and out.

The camera phone won’t replace my digital camera anytime soon, but I have found it useful. I’m sure the quality will improve as time goes on. The Korean and Japanese markets are already selling 5 megapixel camera phones. Who knows, maybe one day we will have 5 megapixles sensors, built-in optics, image stabilization, advanced exposure control, and built-in flash in our PDA phones.

PDA Phone Example 4 – Surf the Web

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 14 2007 09:28 pm

There are tons of websites out there designed specifically for mobile phones. There’s even a .mobi web extension that was created last year. Most popular sites will detect if you are browsing from a mobile phone, and automatically style the site appropriately (sorry, we’re not one of them …yet). Here is a list of some popular sites that have mobile specific pages:

  • m.yahoo.com
  • mobile.google.com
  • weather.com
  • msnbc.com
  • m.youtube.com

Surprisingly, some major sites like espn.com and cnn.com don’t have mobile versions. Espn.com crashes on my PDA phone due to the video script they automatically play on the side. The mobile browser will have to determine how to style a site not designed for phones. The two popular mobile browsers out there are Opera and Internet Explorer with my personal preference being Opera. I found that Opera does a better job displaying pictures in non-mobile websites, and Opera has the added benefit of tabbed browsing. The iPhone will launch with Safari. From the demos, Safari might be better than both IE and Opera.

PDA Phone Example 3 – PDA Functionality

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 14 2007 09:17 pm

As the name states, the PDA phone can perform PDA functions such as spread sheets and word processing. The xv6700 I own runs on Windows Mobile 5, and it include the typical Microsoft Mobile Office programs such as Outlook ,Word, and Excel. Mobile Outlook syncs with my PC’s Outlook so I always have the latest email on my phone. You can get email wirelessly pushed to your phone if you have a data plan and have an email exchange server setup.

PDA Phone Example 2 – Cellular Phone

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 14 2007 09:06 pm

The no-brainer function. Most people would want their PDA phone for the cell phone abilities. However, I have heard of a few people who bought the xv6700 just for the high-speed EV-DO service, and didn’t get an actual cell phone plan.

In my opinion, I wouldn’t purchase the xv6700 PDA phone for its “phone” qualities. Its earpiece isn’t that loud, and it’s hard to quickly punch in numbers. You have to either use the slide-out keyboard, or use the stylus on the touch screen keypad.

However, there are many ways around these issues. The xv6700 has Bluetooth so I mostly talk using my Bluetooth headset, which solves the low earpiece volume issue. The xv6700 also comes with voice dialing, which is what I use to quickly call someone. Phone attributes of the xv6700 aren’t as good as my previous Motorola cell phone, but it’s more than adequate. All the other features far outweigh the low earpiece volume and number keypad negatives.

PDA Phone Example 1 – Connect to the Internet

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
Jun 11 2007 10:58 pm

With the iPhone coming out in a couple weeks, I thought it would be a good time to go through some examples of what a PDA phone can do. The iPhone is a PDA phone, but is one of the first without Window’s Mobile. Can the iPhone do everything listed in the PDA phone applications list? Until it’s released, we can only speculate. For now, I’m going to use my xv6700 to go through the full list.

Number 1 – Internet Access

For all of you who are addicted to the internet, the PDA phone is a perfect way to have constant access. Whether you’re at a relative’s house, on a subway, or anywhere away from home, the PDA phone can access the internet in a multitude of ways.

It was only a few years ago where phones were limited to download speeds of 144kb/s. The 1xRTT download speeds have evolved to high speed services such as EV-DO and WiMAX. The maximum downloads speeds for EV-DO is 2.4 Mbit/s with Rev. 0 and up to 3.1 Mbit/s with Rev. A. You’re basically able to get cable modem speeds on your phone, which opens up application such as streaming audio/video and web browsing.

Some PDA phones come with built-in Wi-Fi, which is the fastest and cheapest way to access the internet. You’ll save $40/month that wireless carriers charge for high speed plans, but you’ll be limited to the sporadic Wi-Fi locations.

The xv6700 has both Wi-Fi (802.11b) and EV-DO capabilities. Verizon is my wireless carrier, and they charge $45/month for EV-DO access. That’s a little too steep of a price for me, but competition should be bringing that price down soon. Until then, I’ll keep searching for Wi-Fi spots.

Samsung Blackjack

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
May 27 2007 12:14 am
Blackberry 8800 SmartphonePrice Comparison
PDA Accessories
PDA Phone Games
Wireless Plans

Upside:

  • 2.2 inch diagonal screen
  • 320 x 240 pixel resolution screen with 65,000 colors
  • 1.3 MP camera
  • HSDPA (High-Speed Downlink Packet Access) Compatible
  • Bluetooth v2.0
  • 220MHz Texas Instruments OMAP1710 dual core CPU processor
  • 128 MB ROM
  • 64 MB RAM
  • MicroSD card slot
  • QWERTY keyboard
  • Speakerphone
  • Mobile 5 Smartphone Edition
  • Mini-USB port

Downside:

  • No Wi-Fi support
  • Uses MS Office document viewer since it lacks a native Office suite
  • No touch screen capabilities

T-Mobile Dash

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
May 26 2007 11:24 pm
Blackberry 8800 SmartphonePrice Comparison
PDA Accessories
PDA Phone Games
Wireless Plans

Upside:

  • 2.4 inch diagonal screen
  • 320 x 240 pixel resolution screen with 65,000 colors
  • 1.3 MP camera
  • Wi-Fi (802.11b/g)
  • Bluetooth v2.0
  • 200MHz OMAP processor
  • 128 MB ROM
  • 64 MB RAM
  • MicroSD card slot
  • QWERTY keyboard
  • Speakerphone
  • Microsoft Windows Mobile 5, Mobile Office
  • Mini-USB port

Downside:

  • Lacks high speed network capabilities such as EV-DO
  • No touch screen capabilities

Blackberry 8800

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
May 26 2007 09:16 pm
Blackberry 8800 Smartphone
Price Comparison
PDA Accessories
PDA Phone Games
Wireless Plans

Upside:

  • 2.5 inch diagonal screen
  • 320 x 240 pixel resolution screen with 65,000 colors
  • Built-in TeleNav GPS Navigator service (available for $10 per month from Cingular)
  • Bluetooth v2.0
  • 312 MHz processor
  • 64 MB ROM
  • MicroSD card slot
  • QWERTY keyboard
  • Speakerphone
  • Long battery life
  • BlackBerry Media player for MP3 music and videos
  • Push to Talk – “Walkie-Talkie” style communication
  • Mini-USB port

Downside:

  • No camera features
  • No Wi-Fi capabilities
  • Lacks high speed network capabilities such as EV-DO. Cingular’s EDGE is the maximum data speed for this phone
  • No touch screen capabilities
  • Blackberry OS limits 3rd party software

Home Theater Network Launches PDAphoneControl.com

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
May 13 2007 10:35 pm

PDAs, portable gaming, phones, cameras, iPODs, GPS navigators, portable TVs, video cameras, and even remote controls have all merged into one device called the PDA phone. PDAphoneControl.com focuses on this all-in-one device, and all the ways you can use, modify, and control a PDA phone.

As part of the yourHTN.com community, users can post their PDA phone experiences to PDAphoneControl.com. Whether it’s watching your Slingbox, controlling your home theater, or just listening to music; let us know how you use your PDA phone.

Palm Treo 700

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
May 13 2007 09:57 pm
palm_treo_lg.jpg

PDA Accessories
PDA Phone Games
Wireless Plans

  • 2.5 inch diagonal screen
  • 240 x 240 pixel resolution screen with 65,000 colors
  • 1.3 MP camera
  • EV-DO high speed internet service
  • Bluetooth
  • 312 MHz Intel Xscale processor
  • 32 MB RAM
  • 128 MB ROM
  • SD card slot
  • QWERTY keyboard
  • Speakerphone

UT Starcom XV6700

By mrHTN – HTN Guru from Orlando, FL
May 13 2007 09:50 pm
xv6700_lg.jpg
PDA Accessories
PDA Phone Games
Wireless Plans
  • 2.8 inch diagonal screen
  • 240 x 320 pixel resolution screen with 65,000 colors
  • 1.3 MP camera with flash
  • Wi-Fi (802.11b)
  • EV-DO high speed internet service
  • Bluetooth
  • 416 MHz Intel Xscale processor
  • 64 MB RAM
  • 128 MB ROM
  • MiniSD card slot
  • Slide out QWERTY keyboard
  • Speakerphone
  • Windows Mobile 5.0
  • Mini-USB port